Artist Profile: Brad Michael Moore

Photographer and digital artist Brad Michael Moore presents his portfolio of “digital artifacts” and speaks about developing a business highly influenced by technology.

 

"Memorial Day" Wet Process FujiColor or Pigmented Ink Print, 50” x 32” by Brad Michael Moore

“Memorial Day” Wet Process FujiColor or Pigmented Ink Print, 50” x 32”

 

ABI:  What is your background, and what techniques do you use?

BMM:  I was born with my left foot in an analog world, but my right foot came down upon a digital landscape, and my art had to manage these two perspectives in collaboration! The description of my art has migrated over 43 years, roundly landing into the realm of modern abstraction these past two decades.

 

“Before Midnight Sun” Wet Process FujiColor or Pigmented Ink Print, 18.8” x 14” by Brad Michael Moore

 

I worked as a commercial photographer at age 17 – having my, “minority removed” in a Texas Court so I could legally enter into a contract for services. The IRS audited my partner, Douglas E. Tomlinson, and me in our first six months. The auditor was kind enough to teach us the best methods of bookkeeping over the next two weeks. So I started out fast, getting on track. After four years in that business, I was interested in traveling the world, and ended up photographing landscapes and wildlife from 1975-1986.

 

 “Welcome to the Port Door” Wet Process FujiColor or Pigmented Ink Print, 24” x 22”

 

As a side business, I built a recording studio, in Dallas, with school friend. We recorded local Texas artists during the period when digital recording came into vogue. This was in the mid-late 1970’s. I experienced firsthand, the depth and scope of the “digital realm” and how it completely changed the music industry forever. I knew then that I needed to develop a new vision for my art, too.

 

“Vanguard of Califate” Wet Process FujiColor or Pigmented Ink Print, 9.1” x 12.7” by Brad Michael Moore

“Vanguard of Califate” Wet Process FujiColor or Pigmented Ink Print, 9.1” x 12.7”

 

In the late 1980’s, I began building an image library of analog images (captured to 6×7 and 4×5 film formats) that later, I could digitize, as soon as that process became affordable. I first began color wet-process printing in 1971.

 

“Tubular Calao Rhinoceros Rex” Wet Process FujiColor or Pigmented Ink Print, 40” x 30” by Brad Michael Moore

“Tubular Calao Rhinoceros Rex” Wet Process FujiColor or Pigmented Ink Print, 40” x 30”

 

Meanwhile, I gained access to a Rare Book Collection at a private University in Texas, where I photographed hundreds of the earliest color plate prints created as a precursor to Darwinism. It became the fad for illustrators who traveled the world, financially backed by both scientific and high art European societies. The plates capturing my interest were made pre-1825. The early illustrator’s goal was to be more flamboyant than accurate, to get more attention! One artist painted a peacock with his “eye feathers” on his wings instead of his tail. So, for me, these were more images of curiosity & imaginative fabrication than natural representations of truest accuracy.

 

“Have You Seen Moon Around” Wet Process FujiColor or Pigmented Ink Print, 23” x 23” by Brad Michael Moore

“Have You Seen Moon Around” Wet Process FujiColor or Pigmented Ink Print, 23” x 23”

 

ABI:  How has your art evolved?

BMM:  It was the late 1980’s, when I became more interested in creating painterly images in the photographic process. I manipulated my images as I widened my concept over the idea of “straight photography” and began creating organic constructions (landscapes) sandwiched between plates of glass, before I photographed them. I would incorporate materials such as foods, condiments, acrylic paints, grasses, and flowers. My trek towards abstraction had begun.

 

“Cacti of My Eye” Wet Process FujiColor or Pigmented Ink Print, 42” x 44” by Brad Michael Moore

“Cacti of My Eye” Wet Process FujiColor or Pigmented Ink Print, 42” x 44”

 

ABI:  What are your plans for the future?

BMM:  Once, I was totally dependent upon my digital library. Now, I’m as likely to begin with a white screen, and paint with my tools like a painter paints with their brushes. I no longer consider myself a working photographer, but an artist incorporating photography in all fashions available to me. I define abstraction as “a vision born from the process of living – experiencing the brilliance of every new opportunity – as an ever-expanding discretion for amendable perspective.”

 

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